Meanings and Origins of Famous Idioms

34 Comments on Meanings and Origins of Famous Idioms

  1. oscar
    May 20, 2016 at 12:00 pm (2 years ago)

    Break the ice: To say something or do to relieve tension. Origin: Back when there were boats as transport the ship would get stuck in the ice, so they would send little boats to “break the ice”.

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  2. ben56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:00 pm (2 years ago)

    1. Rub the wrong way= To irritate them.
    2.Mad as a hatter= Completely insane.
    3. Caught red handed= to be caught with blood on your hands
    4.Break the ice= to become friends with someone.
    5. Give a cold shoulder = To show interest in something

    Ben

    Reply
  3. paddy56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:03 pm (2 years ago)

    1- Rub the wrong way
    MEANING: irritate or annoy someone
    2- Mad as a hatter
    MEANING: your really angry or crazy
    3- Turn a blind eye
    MEANING: ignore someone
    4- Caught red handed
    MEANING: caught doing something suspicious
    5- Break the ice
    MEANING: to become friends

    Reply
  4. oscar
    May 20, 2016 at 12:04 pm (2 years ago)

    IDIOM: Cat got your tongue
    Meaning: Asked to a person who is at a loss for words
    Origin: The English Navy used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails” for flogging. The pain was so severe that it caused the victim to stay quiet for a long time.

    Reply
  5. H.M
    May 20, 2016 at 12:06 pm (2 years ago)

    Expression: Go the whole nine yards
    Meaning: To try your best at something
    Origin: Through World War ll, all the fighter pilots were equipped with nine yards of ammunition. When they ran out, it meant that they had tried their very best to fight off the target, and had used all their ammunition.

    Reply
  6. oscar
    May 20, 2016 at 12:06 pm (2 years ago)

    IDIOM
    Bury the hatchet
    Meaning: To stop a conflict and make peace
    Origins: when it was early in North America when the Puritans were in conflict with the Native Americans. When negotiating peace, the Native Americans would bury all their hatchets and knives.

    Reply
  7. oscar
    May 20, 2016 at 12:09 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom
    Let one’s hair down
    Meaning: To relax or be at ease
    Origin: In the medieval times women hair were usually pulled up. The only time they would “let their hair down” was when they came home and relaxed.

    Reply
  8. D.L
    May 20, 2016 at 12:10 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom: Butter someone up

    Meaning: To convince someone by using a flattering attitude

    Origin: The indians threw 3 balls made of butter (the bad people) at statues of gods to ask for forgiveness

    Idiom: Rub the wrong way

    Meaning: To bother or annoy someone

    Origin This Idiom is an olden day saying,Old americans asked servants to wipe their things
    “The right way” The wrong way is not wiping them with dry fabric after wet fabric) would cause streaks to form and ruin it

    Idiom: Break the ice

    Meaning: To break off a conflict or commence a friendship.

    Origin: Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and for trading . At sometimes , the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice formation. The receiving country would send small ships to “break the ice” to clear a way for the ships.

    Idiom:Caught red handed

    Meaning:It means to be caught doing a bad thing.

    Origin:It comes from a very old English law When a man kills a family animal that isn’t his own.The only way for someone to convict them would be with the blood on their hands.

    Idiom: Give a cold shoulder

    Meaning:Being unwelcoming or impolite toward other people.

    Origin: In medieval England it was law that people were to put a cold piece of meat on the guests shoulder when the owner thought that it was time for the guest to leave.(a polite way)

    Reply
  9. MK
    May 20, 2016 at 12:10 pm (2 years ago)

    Break The Ice – To break off a conflict or commence a friendship. Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and means of trade.
    Mad as a Hatter – To be completely crazy. Its origins date from the 17th and 18th centuries well before Lewis Carroll’s book was published.
    Turn A Blind Eye – To ignore situations. The British Navy hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson, had one blind eye. Once when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked, nevertheless, and was victorious.
    Caught Red Handed – To be caught in the act of doing something wrong. This originates from an old English law that ordered any person to be punished for butchering an animal that wasn’t his own.
    Rub The Wrong Way – To bother or annoy someone. Early Americans, during the colonial times, would ask their servants to rub their oak floorboards the right way.

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  10. oscar
    May 20, 2016 at 12:13 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom
    Give a cold shoulder
    Meaning: Being unwelcoming or antisocial toward someone
    Origin: In medieval England , a person would give a guest a cold piece of meat from the shoulder of a an adult sheep , pork, or beef chop when the the person who’s house it was felt it was time for the guest to leave.

    Reply
  11. holly56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:14 pm (2 years ago)

    Idioms:
    Break the ice: To break a conflict or commence a friendship.
    Before road transportation, ships would be the only transportation. Ships used to get stuck because of the ice and the receiving country would send little boats to “Break The Ice”

    Mad as a hatter: To be completely, utterly crazy.
    In the 17th and 18th century, France, poisoning occurred among hat makers who used mercury for hat felt. The “Mad Hatter Disease” was marked by shyness, irritability and tremors that would make the person seem “mad”

    Cat got your tongue: Ask a person who is at loss of words.
    The English Navy used to use a whip named “Cat-o-nine-tails” for flogging. The pain was excruciating and it caused the victim to stay quiet. Another possible origin could be from ancient Egypt, where liars’ and blasphemers’ tongues were cut and fed to cats.

    Turn a blind eye: To ignore situations, facts or reality.
    A British Naval hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson. Had one blind eye. One time when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking the opposing ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said “I do not see the signal” he attacked and won anyway.

    Let one’s hair down: To relax and be at ease.
    In public, the aristocat women of medieval times were obligated to show up in elegant hair-dos that were usually pulled up. The only time the aristocat women would “let their hair down” was then they came home and relaxed.
    By Holly

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  12. H.M
    May 20, 2016 at 12:14 pm (2 years ago)

    Expression: To let one’s hair down
    Meaning: To relax or be at ease
    Origin: In the public of medieval times, noble women would have to wear their hair up in elegant hair does. The only time they would let down their hair was when they were home alone and relaxed.

    Reply
  13. im
    May 20, 2016 at 12:15 pm (2 years ago)

    Origin: Turn a blind eye: to ignore situations facts or reality.
    The British Naval hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson, had one blind eye. Once when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked, nevertheless, and won.

    Next idiom

    Origin: Rub the wrong way: to annoy someone.
    Early Americans, during the colonial times, would ask their servants to rub their oak floorboards “the right way”. The wrong way would cause streaks to form and ruin it, leaving the homeowner annoyed. Alternatively, it could have derived from rubbing a cat’s fur the “wrong way,” which annoys them.

    Next idiom

    Mad as a hatter: to be crazy
    Origin: It didn’t come from Alice in Wonderland it came from 15th century France where the hat makers would have mercury and make them be mad.

    Next idiom

    Origin: Caught red handed: to be caught doing something wrong.
    This originates from an old law that ordered people to be punished for killing an animal that wasn’t his own. The only way the person could be convicted is if he was caught with the animal’s blood still on his hands.

    Next idiom

    Butter someone up: to impress someone.
    Origin: In India people would make balls of butter and throw them at the gods as a sign for forgiveness.

    Reply
  14. Ed
    May 20, 2016 at 12:15 pm (2 years ago)

    1-Rub the wrong way/Meaning to irritate someone
    2- Mad as a chatter/Meaning completely insane
    3- Caught red handed/Meaning caught doing something suspicious
    4- Break the ice/Meaning to break tension between to others
    5-Turn a blind eye/Meaning pretend to not notice

    Reply
  15. Amelie
    May 20, 2016 at 12:16 pm (2 years ago)

    Butter someone up
    meaning: It means to flatter someone.
    Origin: This is a religious procedure in ancient India. The Indians would throw butter at the statues of gods to beg for forgiveness.
    Cat got your tongue?
    Meaning: someone has gone quiet
    Origin: it could have originated in ancient egypt were liars’ and blasphemers’ tongues were cut out and fed to cats.
    Turn a blind eye
    Meaning: To ignore someone or something
    Origin: When the British forces signaled for a naval captain to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked and won.
    Break the ice
    Meaning: To break tension or awkward silence
    Origin: When smaller ships broke the ice in front of larger ships up when car and plane wasn’t available
    Go the whole nine yards
    Meaning: Try your best, give it all
    Origin: When pilots ran out of their 9 yards of ammunition in WW11, it meant that they had given it all

    Reply
  16. BRENDAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    May 20, 2016 at 12:16 pm (2 years ago)

    My Idioms by Brendan
    1.Break the ice:Break off the conflict or commence a friendship.
    ORIGIN: Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and means of trade. At times, the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice formation.

    Butter some up:To impress someone with flattery
    ORIGIN:A religious act by ancient India. The people would throw butter balls t god statues.

    Mad As a Hatter: To be completely crazy
    Origin: It’s origin comes from the 17th century in France when poisoning happened among hat makers.

    Cat got your tongue: Asked to a person who is at loss of words
    Origin:The English Navy used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails” for flogging. There would be nails on it so when the prisoner was whipped he wouldn’t speak anymore.

    Turn a blind eye:To ignore situations, facts, or reality
    ORIGIN:The British Naval hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson had a blind eye. When people surrendered with the flag he puts the telescope on his blind eye. Then he would say he couldn’t see it so he ordered them to be destroyed.

    Reply
  17. lucal56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:17 pm (2 years ago)

    Mad As A Hatter – In France poisoning started on hat makers, the disease was named Mad Hatter Disease which made the people getting poisoned mad.

    Rub The Wrong Way – To bother someone or annoy them, early Americans would say to their slaves to rub it the right way.

    Caught Red Handed – Being caught in the middle of doing something bad. It originates from the old English law.

    Turn A Blind Eye – To not listen to a situation, it comes from a British naval hero who had one blind eye.

    Break The Ice – To commence friends with someone, it comes from when ships were on journeys and had to get through the ice.

    Reply
  18. E.D.C
    May 20, 2016 at 12:17 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom:Break the ice
    Meaning:To break off conflict or commence friendship
    Origin:Back when road transport wasn’t developed ships were the only way of transport and means of trade. At times the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice. The country the were coming to would send small ships to “break the ice” to clear a way for the trade ships.

    Idiom:Butter someone up
    Meaning: To impress someone with flattery
    Origin: This was a customary religious act in ancient India. The devout would throw butter balls at the statues of their gods to seek favor and forgiveness.

    Idiom:Mad as a hatter
    Meaning: To be complete crazy
    Origin: In 17th century France, poisoning occurred among hat makers who used mercury for the hat felt. The “Mad Hatter Disease” was marked by shyness, and quivers that would make the person appear mad.

    Idiom: Caught red handed
    Meaning: To be caught doing something wrong
    Origin: This originates from an old English law that ordered any person to be punished for killimng an animal that wasn’t his own. The only way the person could be convicted is if he was caught with the animal’s blood still on his hands.

    Idiom: Bury the hatchet
    Meaning: To stop a conflict and make peace
    Origin: This is originated a long time back in North America when the Puritans were in conflict with the Native Americans. When negotiating peace, the Native Americans would bury all their hatchets, knives, and weapons. Weapons literally were buried and made inaccessible.

    Reply
  19. Anneliese
    May 20, 2016 at 12:18 pm (2 years ago)

    IDIOM:Break the ice
    MEANING:To break off a conflict or begin a friendship
    ORIGIN:Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and means of trade. At times, the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice formation. The receiving country would send small ships to “break the ice” to clear a way for the ships.

    IDIOM:Cat got your tongue?
    MEANING:To ask someone who is at loss of words
    ORIGIN:The English used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails”. The pain was so severe that it caused the victim to stay quiet for a long time. Another possible source could be from ancient Egypt, where liars tongues were cut out and fed to the cats.

    IDIOM:Turn a blind eye
    MEANING:To ignore situations, facts, or reality
    ORIGIN:The British had one blind eye. Once when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked.

    IDIOM:Caught red-handed
    MEANING:To be caught doing something wrong
    ORIGIN:This one dates back to the early times North America when the Puritans were in conflict with the Native Americans. The Native Americans would bury all their hatchets, knives, clubs, and tomahawks. Weapons literally were buried and made inaccessible.

    IDIOM: Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water
    MEANING:Don’t get rid of valuable things along with the unnecessary ones.
    ORIGIN: In the early 1500s, people only bathed once a year. Not only that, but they also bathed in the same water without changing it! The adult males would bath first, then the females, leaving the children and babies to go last. By the time the babies got in, the water was clouded with filth. The poor mothers had to take extra care that their babies were not thrown out with the bathwater.

    Reply
  20. maureen56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:18 pm (2 years ago)

    1. To Be Mad As A Hatter
    Meaning: To be completely crazy
    Origin: The mad hatter disease would make you shy, irritable and tremors that would make the person Mad.

    2. Cat Got Your Tongue?
    Meaning: Asked to someone that’s lost for words.
    Origin: It could come from either Egypt where liar’s tongues were cut out and fed to the cat. The second could be from the Cat-O-nine-tails because sometimes the pain was so intense they would stay silent fro a while.

    3. Go the whole Nine yards
    Meaning: Do your Best
    Origin: In WW2 the fighter pilots had nine yards of ammunition, once they ran out it meant they tried their best to fight off the invaders.

    4. Give a Cold Shoulder
    Meaning: Being unwelcome
    Origin: In the olden days if the host thought that it was time for the guest to leave they would put some cold meat on their shoulder.

    5. Bury the Hatchet
    Meaning: To stop conflict and make peace.
    Origin: In the earlier days when North America when the Puritans were in battle, to negotiate peace they would bury all their knives, hatchets and other weapons.

    Reply
  21. claudia56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:20 pm (2 years ago)

    Mad as a hatter.
    Meaning to be insane.
    Origin In the 17th century France poisoning occurred among hat makers who used mercury. It was the mad hatter disease.

    Let one’s hair down
    Origin to relax or to be at ease
    In the medieval times when women were out they had to wear their hair up. They only let their hair down when at home.

    Butter someone up
    Origin to impress someone with flattery
    This was a customary religious term in ancient India. They would make butter balls and throw them at the statues of their gods to seek forgiveness and favor.

    Caught red handed
    Origin to be caught doing something wrong.
    This originates from the own English law that ordered any person to be punished for butchering an animal that wasn’t its own. Anyone could be convicted if he was caught with animals blood on his hands.

    Give a cold shoulder
    Origin in medieval England it was customary to give a guest a cold piece of meat from the shoulder of mutton, pork, or beef chop when the hosts felt like it was time for the guests to leave. It was a polite way of saying ‘you may leave now.’
    by C.L

    Reply
  22. B.W
    May 20, 2016 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

    Idioms:
    1. Butter someone up
    Meaning: To impress someone with flattery
    Origin: This was a customary religious act in ancient India. They would throw butter balls at the statues of their gods to seek favor and forgiveness.
    2. Rub someone the wrong way
    Meaning: To bother or annoy someone
    Early Americans would ask their servants to rub their oak floorboards ‘the right way’. The wrong way (not wiping them properly) would cause streaks to form and ruin it, leaving the homeowner annoyed. Alternatively, it could have come from rubbing a cat’s fur the “wrong way,” which annoys them.
    3. Give a cold shoulder
    Meaning: Being unwelcoming or antisocial towards someone
    Origin: In medieval England, it was traditional to give a guest a cold piece of meat from the shoulder of mutton, pork, or beef chop when the host felt it was time for the guest to leave. This was a polite way to communicate, “You may leave, now.”
    4. Don’t throw the baby out with bathwater
    Meaning: Don’t get rid of valuable things along with unnecessary
    Origin: In the early 1500s, people only bathed once a year. They also bathed in the same water without changing it! The adult males would bath first, then the females, leaving the children and babies to go last. By the time the babies got in, the water was all gross. The mothers had to take extra care that their babies were not thrown out with the bathwater.
    5. Barking up the wrong tree
    Meaning: To have misguided thoughts about an event or situation.
    Origin: This refers to hunting dogs that may have chased their prey up a tree. The dogs bark, thinking that the prey is still in the tree, when the prey is no longer there.

    Reply
  23. paddy56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:22 pm (2 years ago)

    Years ago when big boats got stuck in the ice they will send smaller boats to “break the ice”.

    Reply
  24. Morgan
    May 20, 2016 at 12:24 pm (2 years ago)

    Break the ice
    To say something or do to relieve tension.
    Origin: Back when there were boats as transport the ship would get stuck in the ice, so they would
    send little boats to “break the ice”.

    Butter someone up
    Meaning: To impress someone with flattery
    Origin: This was a customary religious act in ancient India. The devout would throw butter balls at the statues of their gods to seek favor and forgiveness.

    Cat got your tongue?
    Meaning: Asked to a person who is at loss of words
    Origin: The English Navy used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails” for flogging. The pain was so severe that it caused the victim to stay quiet for a long time. Another possible source could be from ancient Egypt, where liars’ and blasphemers’ tongues were cut out and fed to the cats. (What a treat for the cats!)

    Mad as a hatter
    Meaning: To be completely crazy
    Origin: No, you didn’t already know this one, because it didn’t originate from Lewis Caroll’s Alice in Wonderland. Its origins date from the 17th and 18th centuries — well before Lewis Caroll’s book was published. In 17th century France, poisoning occurred among hat makers who used mercury for the hat felt. The “Mad Hatter Disease” was marked by shyness, irritability, and tremors that would make the person appear “mad.”

    Caught red-handed
    Meaning: To be caught in the act of doing something wrong
    Origin: This originates from an old English law that ordered any person to be punished for butchering an animal that wasn’t his own. The only way the person could be convicted is if he was caught with the animal’s blood still on his hands.

    By Morgan

    Reply
  25. MD
    May 20, 2016 at 12:26 pm (2 years ago)

    Break the ice
    Meaning: To break off a conflict or commence a friendship.

    Origin: Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and means of trade. At times, the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice formation. The receiving country would send small ships to “break the ice” to clear a way for the trade ships. This gesture showed affiliation and understanding between two territories.

    Butter someone up
    Meaning: To impress someone with flattery

    Origin: This was a customary religious act in ancient India. The devout would throw butter balls at the statues of their gods to seek favor and forgiveness.

    Cat got your tongue?
    Meaning: Asked to a person who is at loss of words

    Origin: The English Navy used to use a whip called “Cat-o’-nine-tails” for flogging. The pain was so severe that it caused the victim to stay quiet for a long time. Another possible source could be from ancient Egypt, where liars’ and blasphemers’ tongues were cut out and fed to the cats. (What a treat for the cats!)

    Barking up the wrong tree
    Meaning: To have misguided thoughts about an event or situation, a false lead

    Origin: This refers to hunting dogs that may have chased their prey up a tree. The dogs bark, assuming that the prey is still in the tree, when the prey is no longer there.

    Let one’s hair down
    Meaning: To relax or be at ease

    Origin: In public, the aristocratic women of medieval times were obliged to appear in elegant hair-dos that were usually pulled up. The only time they would “let their hair down” was when they came home and relaxed.

    Reply
  26. Ed
    May 20, 2016 at 12:27 pm (2 years ago)

    Origins
    1-Origin: Early Americans, during the colonial times, would ask their servants to rub their oak floorboards “the right way”. The wrong way (not wiping them with dry fabric after wet fabric) would cause streaks to form and ruin it, leaving the homeowner annoyed. Alternatively, it could have derived from rubbing a cat’s fur the “wrong way,” which annoys them.

    2-Origin: No, you didn’t already know this one, because it didn’t originate from Lewis Caroll’s Alice in Wonderland. Its origins date from the 17th and 18th centuries — well before Lewis Caroll’s book was published. In 17th century France, poisoning occurred among hat makers who used mercury for the hat felt. The “Mad Hatter Disease” was marked by shyness, irritability, and tremors that would make the person appear “mad.”

    3-Origin: This originates from an old English law that ordered any person to be punished for butchering an animal that wasn’t his own. The only way the person could be convicted is if he was caught with the animal’s blood still on his hands.

    4-Origin: Back when road transportation was not developed, ships would be the only transportation and means of trade. At times, the ships would get stuck during the winter because of ice formation. The receiving country would send small ships to “break the ice” to clear a way for the trade ships. This gesture showed affiliation and understanding between two territories.

    5-Origin: The British Naval hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson, had one blind eye. Once when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked, nevertheless, and was victorious.

    Reply
  27. April H
    May 20, 2016 at 12:29 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom
    1.Mad as a hatter
    Meaning: Crazy
    Origin: In the 17th century, there was a disease called the “mad hatter disease” which made you appear as mad.
    2. Barking up the wrong tree
    Meaning: to have a false lead
    Origin: hunting dogs that may have chased their prey up a tree.
    3. Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater
    Meaning: don’t throw out valuable things along with unnecessary things.
    Origin: In the early 1500s, people only bathed once a year. A family used the same water and the babies go last. Because the water is so dirty, when the kids get in you can’t see them!
    4. Let one’s hair down
    Meaning: to be relaxed
    Origin: the women in medieval times, women were expected to have elegant hair.
    5. Caught red handed
    Meaning: To be caught doing something wrong
    Origin: there was a punishment for butchering an animal.

    Reply
  28. paddy56
    May 20, 2016 at 12:30 pm (2 years ago)

    Turn a Blind Eye Origin: The British Naval hero, Admiral Horatio Nelson, had one blind eye. Once when the British forces signaled for him to stop attacking a fleet of Danish ships, he held up a telescope to his blind eye and said, “I do not see the signal.” He attacked, nevertheless, and was victorious.

    Mad Hatter Origin: Early Americans, during the colonial times, would ask their servants to rub their oak floorboards “the right way”. The wrong way (not wiping them with dry fabric after wet fabric) would cause streaks to form and ruin it, leaving the homeowner annoyed. Alternatively, it could have derived from rubbing a cat’s fur the “wrong way,” which annoys them.

    Caught red handed Origin: This originates from an old English law that ordered any person to be punished for butchering an animal that wasn’t his own. The only way the person could be convicted is if he was caught with the animal’s blood still on his hands.

    Reply
  29. Alice
    May 20, 2016 at 12:31 pm (2 years ago)

    Rub the wrong way
    It means to bother or annoy someone
    It originates from the early Americans they asked their slaves to rub the floorboards the right way
    Let one’s hair down
    It means to be relaxed or to be at ease
    It originated from the medieval times that when women got home they were allowed to let their hair down

    Caught red handed
    It means that to be caught doing something wrong
    It originated from an old english law that is you were caught butchering an animal that is not one of you own you would be put to jail

    Barking up the wrong tree
    It means to have misguided thoughts about an event or situation, a false lead
    It originated from hunting and leading your prey up a tree.

    Cat got your tongue
    It means asked to a person who is at loss of words
    It originated from the English navy who used to whip people and then they were lost for words

    Butter someone up
    It means to impress someone with flattery
    It originated from the ancient indians who used to through butter balls at their statues of gods for forgiveness

    Reply
  30. A.S
    May 20, 2016 at 12:31 pm (2 years ago)

    Idiom: Break the ice
    Meaning: To stop fighting and start a friendship
    Origin: When ships were the only transportation, the small ships would get caught during the winter because of ice formation.

    Idiom: Butter someone up
    Meaning: To impress someone by flattering them
    Origin: In ancient India, people used to throw balls made of butter at statues of gods to ask for forgiveness and/or favor

    Idiom: Mad as a hatter
    Meaning: To be crazy
    Origin: In France in the 17th century, (before Alice in Wonderland) French hat makers used Mercury. This caused the ‘Mad Hatter Disease’ which was marked by shyness, irritability and tremors that would make people appear crazy!

    Idiom: Caught red-handed
    Meaning: To be caught doing something wrong
    Origin: There was an old English law that ordered anyone who butchered an animal that isn’t their own too be punished. Whoever did this would usually be caught red handed with animal blood

    Idiom: Bury the hatchet
    Meaning: To create peace and stop a fight
    Origin: When Puritans were in conflict in North America with the Native Americans. When the Native Americans were trying to make peace with the Puritans, they buried all of their weapons.

    Reply
  31. H.M
    May 20, 2016 at 12:33 pm (2 years ago)

    Expression: Bury the hatchet
    Meaning: To stop a conflict and make peace
    Origin: When the Puritans were in conflict with the North Americans, and when they were negotiating peace, the native Americans would bury all their hatchets, knives clubs and tomahawks. Weapons were than inaccessible.

    Reply
  32. Mrs Gray
    May 20, 2016 at 9:32 pm (2 years ago)

    Thanks for sharing your learning 5/6. The idioms are very interesting – but a little crazy!

    Reply
  33. Brian
    May 20, 2016 at 9:52 pm (2 years ago)

    Give it a shot – try doing/accomplishing something.
    Be in the same boat – Be in the same situation.
    But what if you are boarded by pirates, like shown here: http://colorkid.net/coloring-pages-boys/coloring-pages-pirates ? You are all in the same boat, but in a different situation.
    Some are quite difficult to understand logically.
    Goose is cooked – Now you’re in trouble
    This is from some historical accident of someone getting burned: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Your%20goose%20is%20cooked
    That is a pretty sad story.

    Reply
    • rryan
      May 23, 2016 at 1:57 pm (2 years ago)

      Thank you for sharing a few new idioms. I have never used ‘Goose is cooked’ and now that I know the origin I don’t think I will.

      Reply

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